COMMENT: Cde SK Moyo, a quintessential freedom fighter


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The Chronicle

LIBERATOR, bureaucrat, corporate communications expert, politician, author and diplomat all come together.
Cde Simon Khaya Moyo was a senior official during the wrestling and thereafter continued to serve his country in various capacities until he took a rest on Sunday.

He won a number of battles during the Liberation War, including an assassination attempt that targeted his boss, Dr Joshua Nkomo in 1977. As he was always at Dr Nkomo’s side as special assistant, a successful blow against Dr. Nkomo could have taken him too.

However, Cde Khaya Moyo had no chance of winning one against a debilitating cancer that had plagued him for some time.

Cde Khaya Moyo, who died in Bulawayo at the age of 76, was a gracious, easy-going man who was diligent in everything he did. Because of his affability, the press and many executives had easy access to him almost always.

For serving his country so diligently for 53 years, Cde SK deserved the highest honor, which it indeed received yesterday when President Mnangagwa declared him a national hero.

“On behalf of the Zanu-PF party, the government, our entire nation, and even on my own behalf, I wish to express my deepest condolences to the Moyo family and in particular to Mama Moyo and the children for their saddest loss” , said the president.

“May they all find comfort in the great honor and consideration our nation had for him. He was and remains our Hero and true Son of the Ground.

The President also praised the great intelligence and ingenuity of Cde Khaya Moyo.

“The Cde SK, as we affectionately called it,” said the president, “has distinguished itself as a true patriot, a freedom fighter and an ingenious and versatile cadre beyond the onerous and risky drudgery of wrestling. which he embraced with selfless courage.

He put all his skills, his intelligence and his pan-African vision at the service of the national cause, both before and after our independence. It was a rare gift of high intelligence that enabled his various deployments and service in many positions, including in the public service.

Cde Khaya Moyo left the country to join the Zimbabwe African People’s Union in 1968 in Lusaka, Zambia. He enrolled at the University of Zambia for a degree in social sciences and soon after enrolled at the prestigious Makerere University in Uganda, where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences in 1973.

Two years later he returned to Lusaka and was appointed secretary / special assistant to Dr Nkomo. He underwent military and intelligence training in then East Germany, becoming a member of the Revolutionary Council as well as a member of the PF-Zapu Central Committee.
Cde Khaya-Moyo has traveled the world with Dr Nkomo and attended several meetings such as the Geneva, Malta and Lancaster House conferences.

In 1980, Cde Khaya Moyo became Deputy Secretary at the Ministry of the Interior with Dr Nkomo as Minister. He rose through the ranks to become Undersecretary at the Department of Justice in 1983.

In 1984 he joined the Ministry of Health, where he was subsequently promoted to Deputy Permanent Secretary in 1987.

He was elected a member of the Zanu-PF central committee at the party congress in 1989 and a year later was elected deputy for Bulilima Mangwe South. In 1992, Cde Khaya Moyo was appointed Deputy Minister of Industry and Trade.

In September 1994, he was re-elected a member of the Zanu-PF central committee and subsequently deputy secretary of the Politburo administration. In the general elections of April 1995, Cde Khaya Moyo was re-elected by an overwhelming majority as deputy for Bulilima Mangwe Sud.

Shortly after the election, the veteran politician was appointed Minister of Transport and Energy.

Between July 1997 and July 2000, Cde Khaya Moyo was Minister of Mines, Environment and Tourism. The following year he began his diplomatic career, having been appointed the country’s ambassador to South Africa and Lesotho until October 2010. He had already been elected to power. national president of the party a year earlier.

In March 2011, he was appointed senator outside the constituency. At the time of his death, he was the national spokesperson for the ruling party and Senator Bulilima.

Indeed, the party and the country as a whole have lost a committed cadre who had illustrious credentials.

We must all strive to emulate his patriotism, his diligence in serving the country, his simplicity and the clarity of his thought and speech.

It will certainly be a tall order for most of his compatriots to serve like the national hero did.

May his soul “anchor”, as he has often said in the countless messages of condolence he has issued as a spokesperson for the party, in eternal peace.

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Thelma J. Longworth